Casting in the wind

Saturday afternoon was warm with a stiff wind for our casting sessions, and my goal was to put some distance in their retrieves. Sophie and Dakota have had a fair amount of training in this area over the years but nothing consistent. For the Spinone, it’s new especially for Doc.

Sophie strolls back with her last couple of retrieves, 4-11-14

Sophie strolls back with her last couple of retrieves, 4-11-14

For Sophie, I lined out three bumpers about 100 feet apart and sent her out. She didn’t take a straight line to the bumpers but insisted on drifting downwind and then working her way back to them. I only ran her for two sets because she was beginning to wear down perhaps due largely to the heat, however she did well with retrieving each bumper in order.

Mia retrieving nicely, 4-11-14

Mia retrieving nicely, 4-11-14

Mia followed Sophie and as with Sophie, she insisted on drifting downwind and then working her way back. I set the first bumper out about 50 feet and each additional one about 30 feet past the first, so they were set at about 50, 80, and 110 feet. Mia took the first bumper, carried it out to the second where she exchanged bumpers. I ran her on four sets and she improved with each one.

Doc delivers the bumper, 4-11-14

Doc delivers the bumper, 4-11-14

Doc was third to train and I only ran him on one set of bumpers; as with Mia, I set them about 50, 80 and 110 feet out and he likewise didn’t take a line, but drifted downwind and worked his way back to the bumpers. He had a lot of trouble with the third bumper and then decided that he didn’t want to retrieve it so I used a version of force-fetching I’d learned. I gave him the bumper and then with a couple of fingers, pushed up on his chin which prevented him from dropping it; holding his chin up in that manner, we ran back to our starting point. I decided to give him a break and let him run the pasture before resuming, but he found a pair of hen Pheasants that had sneaked into the pasture and after that, bumpers were the last thing he wanted.

Doc on a nice point where two hen Pheasants flushed, while working on casting drills, 4-11-14

Doc on a nice point where two hen Pheasants flushed, while working on casting drills, 4-11-14

Dakota was next and I only ran her on a single bumper; more than a single bumper and she becomes completely confused. After each retrieve, I’d walk the bumper out an additional 100 feet or so then send her out. I ran her on four sets of bumpers, and she continues impressing me by taking a perfect line out and back. With just that little amount of exercising, both her and Sophie needed half a Rimadyl.

Dakota kicks up the dust with her retrieves, 4-11-14

Dakota kicks up the dust with her retrieves, 4-11-14

Elvis was last to train and as with Dakota, he took a perfect line out to the bumpers and back. I ran him on about four sets of bumpers and he did a very nice job with his retrieves.

Elvis did a nice job of taking a straight line on his retrieves, 4-11-14

Elvis did a nice job of taking a straight line on his retrieves, 4-11-14

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4 Responses to Casting in the wind

  1. 2browndawgs says:

    If is always interesting how they drift with the wind. Sounds like a good day of training.

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    • I was happy with them. I’m not sure how they would be scored during retriever tests, but I’m not sure if I want to correct them for taking a line downwind of the mark. I think that if your dog takes a good line, you can cast them downwind of the mark; Also, I think it was in one of Bill Tarrant’s books where I read about casting your dog on the uphill side of a mark because the dog will naturally drift down a little.

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  2. Shirley says:

    Hi Robert, I just wanted you to know I have a new e-mail address. I hope you will keep me on your mailing list. It is msshirleyb@tds.net . Thank you. Great work you are doing.. Shirley Bauer.

    Like

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