Training heats up

My trainer invited me to a training session Saturday afternoon, along with the owner of a beautiful little English Setter. The Setter’s owner wanted to check on his pup’s progress, which is actually a smart thing to do if you send your dog off to training. As for me, I wanted to see how Doc and Mia did with honoring, and whether my training workarounds at home were helping or hurting them.

It was sunny and 85 (Fahrenheit) when we began training and 89 when we finished, temperatures never to train in unless you’re careful and well prepared. Although it was a little rough on Doc and Mia, we were well prepared with 5 gallons of water, my 2 coolers of water, a small tub for wetting the dogs down, plus I had Doc and Mia in cooling vests.

With Max on point, upper right, I bring Mia around to honor his point.

With Max on point, upper right, I bring Mia around to honor his point.

Cattle had eaten the grass down so there was nothing but dirt; while the other dogs routinely train in that area and their feet are toughened by it, not so with Doc and Mia. The hot dirt made it uncomfortable for Doc but burnt Mia’s feet to where she shifted from foot to foot while on point or honoring.

Working with Mia on honoring Max.

Working with Mia on honoring Max.

We began by bracing Mia with Max, an English Pointer. Mia started out slowly but eventually got into hunt mode. Max hit a solid point and I influenced Mia around, “Whoa’d” her, and she did a good job of honoring. However I realized that she is a little overweight and out of shape, so for the next month-and-a-half, conditioning is the name of the game.

Carrying Mia away from the bird after it flushed.

Carrying Mia away from the bird after it flushed.

After flushing the pigeon a second time, we carried the dogs away from it so as to save the bird for the next dog; when removing a dog from a bird, you never pull it away with the leash or check cord, but rather pick it up and carry it away from the bird. Max went on point with the second pigeon and this time Mia did a very nice job of honoring.

Mia is doing a nice job of honoring Max.

Mia is doing a nice job of honoring Max.

Lola, the promising Setter pup, was worked next and did very nice job with her birds.

Lola, the Setter pup, doing a great job on her bird.

Lola, the Setter pup, doing a great job on her bird.

Doc was braced with an older German Shorthair and did a great job of honoring the GSP’s retrieve. However it was his being steady-to-wing that caught our attention, which he held with perfection.

Doc doing a nice job of honoring the GSP's retrieve.

Doc doing a nice job of honoring the GSP’s retrieve.

 

Doc found the bird first and did a perfect job of being steady-to-wing after I flushed it.

Doc found the bird first and did a perfect job of being steady-to-wing after I flushed it.

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2 Responses to Training heats up

  1. Wow 89 is hot for upland training. We would be doing pond work. 🙂 I bet you are getting excited for hunting season with your dogs coming along so nicely!

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  2. Anything over 70 degrees needs a careful eye for sure, but I figure that if you train in tough conditions, your dog will be able to hunt in tough conditions. It will be nice to see how they do during hunting season, as I’m planning on entering them in AKC Senior tests next year and maybe NAVHDA Utility testing as well.

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