A day at Duck Point

 

Mia and Doc are NOT fans of the waiting game.

Mia and Doc are NOT fans of the waiting game.

Sunday I took Doc and Mia to an area locals call “duck point”, which are bluffs overlooking the river that ducks and geese use as a flyway. I also found a practical use of the “whoa” command.

I met a couple of hunters who were leaving, and they told me a little about the area, how to hunt it, and how the flocks were flying that day.

 

Doc, with Mia in front of the cedar tree below, climb the steep hillside after inspecting the river bank.

Doc, with Mia in front of the cedar tree below, climb the steep hillside after inspecting the river bank.

Not long after positioning ourselves under a cedar tree, a large flock of ducks flew overhead, fighting the heavy wind. They were right at gun range and I deliberated all the time they were approaching before finally passing up the shot. The flock continued on and drew some fire from the duck blinds behind me, but nothing fell.

 

Mia pointing a covey of partridge with Doc honoring.

Mia pointing a covey of partridge with Doc honoring.

Sitting and waiting is definitely NOT Mia or Doc’s idea of hunting, however I rewarded their patience with a 5-minute run about every 20 minutes, as long as nothing was flying.

Mia pointing a rooster Pheasant with Doc honoring - however Pheasant season ended a month ago in this area.

Mia pointing a rooster Pheasant with Doc honoring – however Pheasant season ended a month ago in this area.

After lunch I decided to scout the area, give the dogs a run, and hopefully run into some partridge since not much was flying. Mia did bump a covey but they were out of range, but given the 30-plus mile per hour winds, I couldn’t fault her. I saw where the covey landed and we went after them. Mia went on point with Doc honored nicely; however the birds having, already been spooked, flushed before I could get close enough for a good shot although I did take a long shot and miss.

Doc was the only casualty of the day, having slightly slipped a pad on the lava rocks. Nothing that Neosporin and a bandage couldn't cure though.

Doc was the only casualty of the day, having slipped a pad on the lava rocks. Nothing that Neosporin and a bandage couldn’t cure though.

During our venture, I found a practical application of the “whoa” command. When I saw an approaching flock, I’d whoa Doc and Mia so that their movement wouldn’t frighten the birds. It seemed to work, we were just never in the right place at the right time for a shot.

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2 Responses to A day at Duck Point

  1. That looks like an interesting place to hunt. Isn’t it always the case. You come across a bird, in this case a pheasant, out of season? Good job doggies. Hope Doc’s foot is better soon.

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    • Thanks, his foot is healing up quickly, it wasn’t too bad but bled pretty good. I don’t think there’s anything worse on a dog’s foot than lava rock – not to mention the cactus. But I think I’ve found a new area for both Pheasants and partridge as well. I’ll definitely return now that I’m getting an idea of how to hunt it, and if the reservoirs ever freeze over, there’ll be a lot more flocks. But with hunting in blinds, I think that wind currents have a lot to do with their flight patterns and even 20 feet could mean the difference between getting a shot or not.

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